Tag Archives: Cutters

Free Ship Plans of Coast Guard Cutter

Coast Guard Cutter White Sumac

Converted from Navy Yard Lighter

Small Size Allows Ship Modeler to Build to Larger Scale

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U.S.C.G. Cutter White Sumac shortly after conversion from a Navy lighter.

The U.S. Coast Guard cutter White Sumac was originally constructed as a yard lighter (YF416) for the United States Navy in 1943. This class of vessel provided logistical support to naval operations during World War II. Following the War, the Coast Guard acquired eight of these vessels to use as buoy tenders. The vessel was documented as part of a National Park Service program that documents historically significant engineering, industrial, and maritime sites in the U.S. These plans are maintained by the Library of Congress.

United States Coast Guard Cutter White Sumac is small enough that a model shipwright could use our plans to build at a larger scale without producing a model too large to handle. A 1/48 scale model would only be a little over 33 inches.
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Free Ships Plans of Motor Vessels, too!

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U.S. Coast Guard cutter White Sumac

Our posts have featured a lot of sail- and oar-powered free ship plans of late, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have Motor Vessels as well.

Two of our favorites are the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter White Sumac, and the Steam Tug Hercules.

The U.S. Coast Guard cutter White Sumac was originally constructed as a yard lighter (YF416) for the United States Navy in 1943. This class of vessel provided logistical support to naval operations during World War II. Following the War, the Coast Guard acquired eight of these vessels to use as buoy tenders.

Built in 1907, the Steam Tug Hercules was ground-breaking with its steel hull and triple-expansion steam engine. Now the only remaining ocean-going steam tug on the West Coast, Hercules was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986.

Free ship plans utility vessels
Steam Tug Hercules

The free ship plans for both of these vessels come from their documentation as part of the Historic American Engineering Record, a program of the National Park Service. The photos and drawings from those surveys are kept by the Library of Congress. The Hercules Photo Gallery is posted, I’ll update when we get the White Sumac Photo Gallery up on the site.

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